Monuments, Museums and Teenagers! Oh My!

Teenagers. They’re dirty, moody, starving creatures that arise to see the light of day sometime after noon only to slink back into their cave after raiding the village for food. Fortunately for us, our teen monster is very interested in history. So, when we proposed a trip to Washington, D.C.; he was all for it.

When we started planning this trip, we planned it with Jayden in mind. He doesn’t travel like we do. We go, go, go all day. He doesn’t. So, to ensure that he didn’t lose interest in what we were doing right away we made sure to plan time each day for him to do whatever he wanted. Whatever that might be. Taking a nap. Watching youtube, what have you. Washington, D.C. has so much to see, that there’s no way you could get to everything in a week. So we allowed Jayden to make a list of things he absolutely had to see and another list of places we would see if we had time.IMG_2035

We booked our trip the week following Jaydens last day of school, which brought us to D.C. on Memorial Day. The city was buzzing.  Streets were closed, parades were marching by and food trucks lined the national mall.

Where We Went and What We Learned:

The White House: The White House has been the residence of every U.S. President since John Adams in 1800. The building was burned down by the British during the War of 1812. It takes 570 gallons of white paint to paint the entire exterior of the building. Tours of the White House need to be requested through your member of congress.

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The White House South Lawn.

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The White House North Lawn.

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View of the White House from Lafayette Square.

Vietnam War Memorial: The main part of the memorial, the wall, was completed in 1982. It was fully funded by private donations. Celebrities such as Bob Hope helped with the fund raising. A 21 year old Yale University student won the memorial design contest. The wall was the subject of much criticism and so two statues were added as part of the memorial: the three servicemen and the Vietnam Nurses statue. Tributes and memorials are left at the wall daily. These items are collected and taken to a storage facility in Maryland. They are used in traveling exhibits.

We had the honor of finding the name of a serviceman that had served with my Uncle. This memorial is both beautiful and heartbreaking at the same time. No one really speaks when they stand in front of it. There’s a lot of pain and feeling of betrayal here. Admission: Free

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Vietnam Nurses Memorial

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Vietnam Wall

Lincoln Memorial: The memorial was dedicated in 1922 after having taken more than 50 years to get it built. The design is based on the Parthenon of Greece. Bacon, the memorial architect was quoted as saying “a memorial to the man who defended democracy should be modeled after a structure from the birthplace of democracy.” Lincoln’s son, Robert Todd Lincoln, lived to see the dedication of the memorial. He was 78 years old at the time. The steps of the Lincoln Memorial is the site of Martin Luther King Jr’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech. There is a plaque indicating where he stood. Admission: Free

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Abraham Lincoln statue inside the Lincoln Memorial

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View of reflecting pool from Lincoln Memorial. Fog is blocking the Washington Monument.

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Lincoln Memorial

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Step on the Lincoln Memorial where MLK stood while giving his “I Have A Dream” speech.

Washington Monument: The Washington Monument stands 555′ tall and was built to commemorate the first President of the United States. The trowel used to lay the cornerstone of the Washington Monument was the same trowel used by President Washington to lay the cornerstone of the Capitol building in 1793.

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Washington Monument reflected in the reflecting pool. 

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Washington Monument

Korean War Memorial: The memorial was dedicated in 1995 by President Bill Clinton and South Korean President Kim Young Sam. The memorial is made up of 4 parts: the statues, the mural wall, the pool of reflection and the united nations wall. The mural wall depicts images from photographs taken during the war. Jayden’s great-grandfather served during the Korean War. Admission: Free

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The Mural Wall of the Korean War Memorial.

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Korean War Memorial. Jayden’s Great-Grandfather served during the Korean War. 

World War II Memorial: This memorial didn’t exist when I visited D.C. back in high school, although its plans were in the works. President Clinton signed a public law in 1993 authorizing the establishment of a WWII memorial. Construction didn’t start until 2001 and it finally opened in 2004. The memorial is dedicated to all those who served and all those who supported the war effort at home. Admission: Free

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Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial: The FDR Memorial is probably my favorite. The red granite that makes up the walls of this memorial were brought in from my home state of South Dakota. The memorial is divided into rooms, each representing a different part of his presidency. FDR’s words engraved throughout the walls ring just as true today as they did then. Admission: Free

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Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial. Words to remember.

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Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial. 

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Franklin Delano Rosevelt Memorial

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Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial

Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial: The Martin Luther King Memorial is not too far from FDR. It is a 30 foot high relief of MLK made of white granite. From the memorial, you can look out over the tidal basin and see the Jefferson Memorial. The memorials address is 1964 Independence Avenue referencing the 1964 Civil Rights Act. More than 900 applicants from 52 countries entered the design contest for the memorial. Admission: Free

Jefferson Memorial: The memorial was dedicated in 1943 by FDR. Originally, it was supposed to be a memorial to Theodore Roosevelt. The start of construction inspired ‘The Cherry Tree Rebellion’ in which 50 women marched on the White House to protest the removal of cherry trees. Some women even chained themselves to trees at the construction site. Admission: Free

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Jefferson Memorial

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Statue of Thomas Jefferson inside the Jefferson Memorial.

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Jefferson Memorial

US Marine Corps War Memorial: aka the Iwo Jima Memorial was dedicated in 1954 by president Dwight D Eisenhower. The sculpture is based off the 1945 Pulitzer Prize winning photograph of the second flag raising on Iwo Jima by AP photographer Joe Rosenthal. The faces on the sculpture are the actual faces of the men in the photograph. Admission: Free IMG_2457

Arlington National Cemetery: The cemetery was established in 1864 and hosts more than 400,000 graves. In 1868, May 30th was proclaimed to be Decoration Day for the sole purpose of decorating the graves of fellow soldiers. The day was later renamed Memorial Day. Arlington is the only National Cemetery to hold service members from every war in US history. There may no longer be any additions to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier due to DNA testing. Admission: Free

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Wilted flower left on a stone after Memorial Day in Arlington National Cemetery.

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Arlington National Cemetery. Tree slowly consuming a headstone.

Museums We Visited and What We Saw:

Holocaust Museum: It’s difficult to find the right words to describe the contents of this museum or the way it makes you feel. It’s something you need to experience in person. You need to read the words for yourself. See the images. Experience the smells. Any description I provide would do it an injustice. You just need to go. Admission: Free, but will need a timed ticket from March-August.

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Holocaust Museum

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Ovens, Holocaust Museum.

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Shoes, Holocaust Museum.

Ford’s Theater: The theater houses a small museum in the downstairs of the theater showcasing articles of clothing, John Wilkes Booth’s torn boot and the flag torn by his spur as he made his escape. After viewing the museum, you’re able to head into the theater where you can see the balcony where Lincoln was shot. Ford’s Theater also includes the house across the street where Lincoln took his last breath. The house was under renovation while we were there, so we could only view it from the street. Admission: $3.00 pp.

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Ford’s Theatre

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Balcony where President Lincoln was shot. Ford’s Theatre.

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Balcony where President Lincoln was shot. Ford’s Theatre.

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House across the street from Ford’s Theatre where Lincoln passed away.

International Spy Museum: The Spy Museum is not part of the National Mall, so it does cost money to get into, but believe me it is worth it! Upon arrival you’re taken downstairs into a small room with columns filled with different aliases. You’re allowed to pick whichever one you want. After making your choice, you commit all the information to memory. After all, a good spy should never be caught with info on his person! All throughout the museum they have kiosks where you can answer questions about your mission. If you answer them correctly, you keep your spy status. However, if you do not, your cover will be blown. The museum showcases spy equipment used during WWII and the Cold War. It even discusses the use of spies as far back as Queen Elizabeth I. Admission: $21.95 pp.

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National Museum of American History: Here we saw the first Da Vinci Robotic arm that’s used in our operating rooms today. There’s a fragment of Plymouth Rock and examples of the government issued clothing options for women during WWII. We saw many examples of popular culture artifacts including the first computer and the same Little People farmhouse that I played with as a child (kind of makes me feel old). Admission: Free

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My childhood toy. National Museum of American History.

National Museum of Natural History: The Hope Diamond is a big attraction here. Get here early to avoid the crowd. You’ll also find fragments of an asteroid that landed in Arizona and if you happen to be standing at one of the balconies you’ll see the lobby where one of the Night at the Museum movies was filmed. The museum was in the process of completing a large dinosaur exhibit while we were there. It looks like it’s going to be amazing. Admission: Free

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National Museum of Natural History, Lobby seen in Night at the Museum Movie.

National Air and Space Museum: I’m a big Apollo 13 fan, so I was pretty excited to see Gene Kranz’s Apollo 13 vest that his wife had made for him. Also because we’re huge nerds, we were excited to read about the USS Enterprise. No not the ship made to boldly go where no one has gone before. It was actually the most decorated aircraft carrier in WWII, earning 20 battle stars. Admission: Free

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Apollo 13, National Air & Space Museum.

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Wasps, National Air & Space Museum.

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National Air & Space Museum, U.S.S. Enterprise.

National Archives: The National Archives was founded in 1934 by FDR. It is home to The Declaration of Independence, The Bill of Rights and The Constitution. In order to maintain the preservation of the documents, the room is kept fairly dark and cool. The documents are pretty faded and hard to read, and it’s a very busy place so you’ll want to get there as early as possible. Amazing to be so close to these documents. It’s well worth a visit. Admission: Free

Mount Vernon: Mount Vernon is the home and final resting place for George and Martha Washington. The estate was nearly in ruins before the Mount Vernon Ladies Association was founded and raised $200,000 to purchase the home and 200 acres and start renovations. The exterior of the home looks like it’s made of stone, but Washington actually made a faux finish by putting sand in the paint to give the appearance of stone. The property hosts a stable, distillery and a gristmill and you can place your hands on trees that were planted by George Washington in 1785. If you’re a fan of the National Treasure movies, you already know that a scene in the second movie was filmed at Mount Vernon. They even offer a National Treasure tour where they take you to see the filming locations and talk about that secret passageway! Mount Vernon is privately run and does not receive government funding so there is a fee to get in. Admission: $20 pp, 11 and under $12 pp, National Treasure Tour $10 pp

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Where We Ate!

Food Trucks: There were plenty of food trucks along the national mall. We found some Andalusia Style tacos to try.

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Food trucks along the National Mall.

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Andalusia Style Street Tacos.

Founding Farmers: Amazing farm to table cuisine. A favorite, I’ve read, of Michelle Obama’s. The restaurant is owned by more than 47,000 family farms. We had handmade butternut squash mascarpone ravioli, shrimp and grits with andouille, and skillet cornbread with honey.

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Shrimp and Grits, Founding Farmer’s.

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Butternut Squash Ravioli, Founding Farmer’s.

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Skillet Corn Bread, Founding Farmer’s.

Shake Shack: Our son isn’t an adventurous eater. So anytime we can get a burger, fries and a shake that doesn’t taste like fast food debauchery we’re all for it. We were pleasantly surprised with Shake Shack and there is one right next door to the International Spy Museum, so right after our tour we stopped by for a quick lunch. 

Good Stuff Eatery: Another great spot for a really good burger, fries and a shake. We found this one in Georgetown, which we came to love!

Luke’s Lobster: All I have to say is BEST lobster roll ever! Plus their location in Georgetown is really cozy and cute!

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Best lobster roll ever! Luke’s Lobster, Georgetown.

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Cozy upstairs in Luke’s Lobster, Georgetown.

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Luke’s Lobster, Georgetwon.

Pi Pizzeria: A convenient location close to the White House. Perfect for hungry teens!

Wicked Waffle: As the name implies, all their menu items have a waffle component. Everything we had was delicious and the perfect meal after a morning of walking to all the monuments.

Georgetown: Georgetown was a short 10 minute walk from our hotel. We loved the area immediately. The area is filled with little shops, pubs and restaurants. A few of our favorite places include: Georgetown Cupcake, Olivia Macaron, Dean & Deluca, Luke’s Lobster and Good Stuff Eatery. There’s a small park at the end of the main area that contains a memorial for Francis Scott Key. And if you take the path by the river, you’ll walk by the Watergate Hotel, where we all know that Forest Gump got President Nixon in trouble! 😉

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Street View in Georgetown.

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Georgetown Cupcake

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Cupcakes from Georgetown Cupcake

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Macarons from Olivia Marcaron

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The Watergate Hotel

Where We Stayed: The River Inn on 25th street is located on a quiet street in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood. It’s only a 10 minute walk from Georgetown, which we loved! Also it’s close to the metro. We opted to walk as much as we could while in D.C. The National Mall was only about a 25 minute walk from the hotel. 

Our room was very cozy and had a small kitchen where we could cook our own meals if we wanted. The hotel gave you the option of having them stock the fridge for you. We used it mainly to store leftovers from wherever we had eaten or whatever treats we had found in Dean & Deluca! The hotel had a few tables and chairs outside for its guests to sit and relax. We made good use of them. At the end of a long day, it was the perfect spot to wind down.

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Patio at The River Inn

Since all the monuments and most of the museums are free, our biggest expenses came from our flight, hotel and food. We used Uber a couple of times, but mostly we walked everywhere we needed to go. It is a very affordable family vacation. I’ll share our itinerary for D.C. in my next post.


My Wild New Orleans Weekend

New Orleans…….there’s a peculiar vibe that echoes along the streets as you walk through. A three hundred year old energy that draws you in and makes you feel like you’re not alone on this plane sustained by the smell of jasmine that comes and goes like a transient daydream.

It’s an amazingly refreshing smell; that is until you reach Bourbon Street. Synonymous with street drinking, flashing girls, beads and public intoxication; Bourbon Street definitely lives up to its reputation. If I may be so blunt… it’s gross. There are puddles of murky, putrid foulness everywhere. Now, I know I don’t paint a pretty picture of Bourbon Street, but it’s kind of a rite of passage when you visit New Orleans for the first time. You still should try it. Buy a drink in an obnoxiously large cup and walk down the street. Even if you only walk a block, you should do it at least once.

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The Food

Mark Twain said it best when he called New Orleans food “as delicious as the less criminal forms of sin”. New Orleans has flavors you can’t find anywhere else. Everything we ate was a grand experience for our taste buds. I’d be lying if I said we weren’t in a food coma throughout the entire trip. I’ll go into greater detail about what and where we ate in my next post.

Ghosts, Alligators and Vampires

We headed out to the Bayou early Sunday morning for an up close and personal with the local gators. The Bayou is beautiful. The trees are covered with Spanish moss, there are magnificent looking birds and of course alligators. Funny thing about Spanish moss, it’s not Spanish and neither is it a moss. It actually is from the same family as pineapples and is native to the Bahamas, Mexico and Southern United States.

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Seeing the gators in the wild and interacting as opposed to the ones in the zoo that just lay in one sad spot all day was incredible. It was incredible to see them laying in ambush mode, waiting for a raccoon or bird to get too close to the edge of the water. Our swamp tour included some wild boar and raccoons and we even got to see the tree that Disney used for inspiration for “The Princess and the Frog”.

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Tree Disney used as inspiration for “The Princess and the Frog”.

Sunday night we took one of the New Orleans Ghost/Vampire tours. It was a lot of fun touring the city at night and hearing all the local ghost stories. We got to see one of the houses used to film “Interview with the Vampire” and the haunted home that had been purchased by Nicholas Cage and supposedly bankrupt him. Although we didn’t see any ghosts, our tour guide was an amazing story-teller.

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Building used in “Interview with the Vampire” film.

The French Quarter

The French Quarter is so beautiful. The architecture is like nothing you’ve ever seen before. The intricate iron work, the big beautiful balconies with all the hanging ferns. And the colors! Everything is so colorful!

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So many beautiful colors in New Orleans!

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That balcony! Those ferns!

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Let me twist that stache! 

We started Monday morning in the French Quarter with beignets and chicory coffee at Café Du Monde. After our delicious breakfast, we headed over to Jackson Square. Jackson Square was the site of the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. A statue of the hero of the Battle of New Orleans (1815), Andrew Jackson adorns the heart of Jackson Square. The beautiful St. Louis Cathedral overlooks the Square and is open for visitors to take a peek inside unless mass is in session. Muriel’s restaurant also overlooks Jackson Square and is a great place for lunch. If you’re looking for some delicious adult beverages they have those too and allow you to enjoy them on their balcony overlooking the square where you can watch the artists performing and selling their beautiful works of art on the sidewalks surrounding.

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Jackson Square, New Orleans.

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St. Louis Cathedral, New Orleans.

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St. Louis Cathedral, basilica ceiling.

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St. Louis Cathedral, New Orleans.

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Muriel’s overlooking Jackson Square.

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After exploring the square, we headed over to the French Market. I have to admit, the French market was a little disappointing. The market is full of souvenirs to fulfill your every whim, but the vendors are all selling the same things and very little of it was actually hand-made. So needless to say, we walked through the market pretty quickly and then headed over for a relaxing walk along the levees. New Orleans turned 300 this year and the city has a small lit anniversary sculpture to commemorate the event.

WWII Museum

Everything in the French Quarter is a lot closer together than you think, so we were able to see and do everything we wanted in a lot less time than we initially planned. So with our extra time, we headed over to tour the WWII Museum. It came highly recommended by some of my co-workers, so we decided to check it out. Let me tell you, we were not disappointed. The museum is amazing and is very well-organized. It’s very interactive including a simulated train ride and submarine ride. Those are not included in a regular ticket but can be added on for a little extra. With a regular ticket you get a key card that you register on a kiosk before you enter the museum. From the kiosk, you get to pick someone either military or civilian who served during WWII and you can follow their stories throughout the exhibits with the kiosks located all throughout the building.

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National WWII Museum, New Orleans

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National WWII Museum Lobby

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Model of the D-Day Invasion

Better than Bourbon?

During our visit, a lot of the local residents told us we needed to check out Frenchmen Street. So we did and it did not disappoint. If you’re looking for a Bourbon Street-like experience, but without the obnoxious smell or inebriated people; well then Frenchmen Street is definitely for you. The average age of the people who hang around Frenchmen Street is about 10 years older than Bourbon Street, there are better options for Jazz Clubs and they have a great open air market called Palace Market where local artists sell their work. I love art and getting to meet the artist is an incredible bonus. We came home with some really great pieces.

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The Spotted Cat on Frenchmen Street

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The Spotted Cat on Frenchmen Street

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Palace Market, Frenchmen Street

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Palace Market, Frenchmen Street

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Palace Market, Frenchmen Street

The Garden District

In the Garden District you will find some of the most beautiful architecture we’ve ever seen. The mansions are spectacular and home to quite a few celebrities. We managed to find one of writer Anne Rice’s homes. It was pretty spectacular. The Garden District is also home to a beautiful historic cemetery, Lafayette Cemetery No. 1. You do not need a tour guide for this particular cemetery, but people are available at the entrance if you do want one. Since most of New Orleans is below sea level, above ground tombs are a necessity. The design and architecture of these crypts is beautiful. So much history can be seen here, a lot of the graves show many generations of a family in the same tomb. The Garden District is accessible via the Saint Charles Street Car if you’re not crunched for time. If you do take the street car, make sure you have exact change for the ride. Some locations allow you to purchase a day pass if you plan on riding the street cars around the city.

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One of author Anne Rice’s homes

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Lafayette Cemetery No. 1, Garden District

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Lafayette Cemetery No. 1, Garden District

Preservation Hall

“If you have to ask what jazz is, you’ll never know.”
― Louis Armstrong

My husband and I were a couple of band geeks throughout our middle and high school careers, but neither of us could have ever dreamed of being as amazing as the musicians at Preservation Hall. It’s the jazz music your band teacher has wet dreams about.

If you want to hear traditional New Orleans jazz in an intimate setting, Preservation Hall is the place. The venue is however very small, so intimate is an accurate description. We opted to purchase tickets for the “Big Shot” seats. These tickets allow you to skip the line and have an actual seat in the two front rows. If you don’t have tickets, you will have to get in line early to get in and you will be standing for the performance as well. Now, even if you’re not able to get into Preservation Hall, you’ll still have plenty of opportunities to hear jazz music. There are jazz clubs all over the city or you may come across an impromptu performance on a street corner.

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Outside Preservation Hall

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The Stage at Preservation Hall.

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Jazz performance outside Cafe Du Monde.

Although short, our trip to New Orleans was amazing. She’s an amazing hostess, and there’s no place quite like her. Until we meet again New Orleans, we bid you adieu.

 

 

 

 

 

 


I Heart NYC!

Can you do NYC in 3 days? Yes. Will you be exhausted? Yes. Will your feet hurt? Probably. Should you do it? Absolutely! We did and saw a ton of cool things, ate some great food and listened to some amazing music. We were extremely exhausted and our feet hurt sooo bad by the time we got home but it was totally worth it. Here’s how our 3 days played out.

Day 1

Our first mission after we checked into our hotel was to get some New York City pizza! It was delicious and of course we ate too much!  After lunch we walked down by the water and were able to jump on one of the tour boats that take you around Hudson Bay. We went under the Brooklyn and the Manhattan bridges and then got a good look at the Statue of Liberty. Those lines fill in fast so get there early.

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Brooklyn Bridge

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Boat ride with NYC skyline reflected in the window.

Next we ventured over to the 9/11 Memorial site and toured the museum. I remember exactly where I was and what I was doing the day that tragedy changed our country forever, as I’m sure most of you do too. As a result, the emotional experience was greater than it has been for any other memorial or museum I’ve ever been too.

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Reflecting Pool 9/11 Memorial

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Rose left on 9/11 Memorial with new World Trade Center building in background.

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Remains of concrete stairs from one of the towers. 9/11 Memorial Museum

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Fire truck, 9/11 Museum

We decided to stay in a hotel that was away from all the craziness, so we booked one located in the financial district of lower Manhattan only a couple of blocks from the shore of the East River. Our hotel was also just a couple blocks from the famous Wall Street Bull, but it was always completely surrounded by tourists whenever we walked by. (Hint: If you want to take a picture with the Wall Street Bull and not have to wait in line with a thousand other people, go on Sunday morning before 8am. There’s absolutely no one around at that time!)

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Wall Street Bull

Day 2

What’s wonderful about New York is all the history you can stumble upon just walking through the city. We happened to stumble upon Trinity Church and right next to the church is a graveyard where you can find the burial site of Alexander Hamilton. Some gravestones around the church are so old, you can barely make out the writing on them. Many visitors leave pennies on the graves of Alexander Hamilton and his wife, which after a quick Google search revealed that leaving pennies on the grave would show the deceased loved one’s that they’re loved or simply that you visited. I didn’t want to leave a penny unless it meant something good, so after my research I learned that leaving a penny was not only meaningful but also a very old tradition.

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Trinity Church, NYC

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Grave of Alexander Hamilton.

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Graveyard, Trinity Church, NYC.

Next, we took an Uber to Times Square. It’s colorful, noisy, full of people and very touristy. There are plenty of places to shop and interesting characters that, for a small fee, will let you take a picture with them. We stayed long enough to snap a few photos and then headed over to Central Park.

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Times Square, NYC.

For us Midwesterners, Central Park was a beautiful respite from the concrete jungle that is New York. The park is absolutely gorgeous and a lot bigger than you think it is. We stopped by Strawberry Fields to pay homage to John Lennon then found a hot dog cart and headed over to the lake to have a picnic. The weather was perfect, the birds were chirping, squirrels running around and children playing. It was perfect.

We continued to stroll through the park until we emerged on the other side to find the Guggenheim. I’ve always wanted to visit this museum ever since I learned about its architectural design and saw Will Smith chase an alien all the way to the top in Men in Black. It did not disappoint. Afterwards we walked down to the Met to peruse their collection of Rembrandts.

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Strawberry Fields, Central Park, NYC.

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The Guggenheim!

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Rembrandt, Self Portrait. Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYC.

On our way back to our hotel, we stopped in Little Italy for supper. We were told by a New York native about a restaurant called Lunella Ristorante and it was the most amazing Italian food we’ve ever eaten! Plus, the owner schooled Reed on the proper way to pour oil and vinegar for dipping bread. (The vinegar goes first!) We talk about that pasta we had there all the time! We can’t wait to go back just to eat there again!

 

Day 3

On our last day in NYC, we decided to head up to Chelsea to have breakfast in the Chelsea Market. After some lemon ricotta French toast, we climbed up to the High Line and headed over to Pier 86 on the Hudson River to tour the Intrepid Museum. The Intrepid is an aircraft carrier that served tours of duty in World War II and the Vietnam War. It was also used as a recovery ship for some of the space missions. Many of the volunteers on the ship are former military. One particular gentleman on our tour was not only a World War II Veteran, but he had also served on the Intrepid! It was amazing to hear his stories and listen to him explain his job on the ship. Our WWII Veterans are becoming fewer and fewer, so to be able to meet him and hear his story was an amazing experience that we will never forget! The museum also houses the space shuttle Enterprise in their space exhibit.

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Chelsea Market, NYC

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Inside Chelsea Market, NYC.

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The High Line, NYC

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The deck of the Intrepid Museum.

 

 

After our tour, we headed over to the Museum of Modern Art. Van Gogh’s Starry Night is our all time favorite painting. To be able to see it in person was absolutely amazing! Get there early though, large groups tend to crowd around the painting, which is a lot smaller than you realize.

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Starry Night, Vincent Van Gogh. Museum of Modern Art, NYC

After leaving the museum, we decided to explore the neighborhood for a while and just happened to turn a corner and found the LOVE sculpture! I had forgotten about it until we saw it. It’s a great place for a cute selfie, if nothing else! IMG_20160612_145052

In the evening we headed over to Webster Hall, which was the reason for our trip in the first place, to see Tom Petty and his pre-Heartbreakers band Mudcrutch. Webster Hall is a very old and iconic venue for performers and it was amazing to get to see a legend play there.

Having grown up in a small town (so small there’s less than 350 people who live in it) you wouldn’t think I would like being in a city as large and crowded as NYC. But as it turns out, I fell in love with it. The sights, the sounds, the smells (some were questionable), everything about this city feels like you’re starring in your own sitcom.

Although we did manage to see and do so much in our 3 days, there’s still so much we didn’t get to see and do. So, until next time NYC! We’ll be back!