Best Places to Eat in New Orleans

When we’re traveling to a new place, we shun eating anywhere that we can find back home. We avoid the chain restaurants like they’re the plague. Why in god’s name would you visit somewhere like New Orleans and eat at Burger King or Arby’s? If you’re the type of person who would visit one of the most culinary diverse cities in the world and eat at McDonald’s, you are automatically dead to me. That was harsh. No you’re not dead to me, but I will give you a very intense WTF stare.

Many talk about the different Cajun and creole foods you can find in New Orleans, now while those two names are used interchangeably they are by no means the same. The names creole and Cajun were derived by the people who created them and the food they had access to. Cajun is considered “country food” while creole is considered “city food”. Tomatoes used to be a major determining factor for whether you were eating creole or Cajun food. Since the city people had access to tomatoes from ships coming into port, their dishes tended to have them whereas the Cajun’s didn’t have access. The two cuisines have since been integrated and now both make use of tomatoes in their recipes. Another misconception is that the food is spicy. I can honestly say, the food is not spicy, but it is very well spiced lending to the bold flavors we experienced.

Another thing we found incredibly interesting is the lack of bread plates in New Orleans fine dining restaurants. After our second meal with no bread plates, I asked our waiter about it. He said that people in New Orleans do not use bread plates because they love to party and have a good time. They love to eat and don’t need to bother with putting bread on a plate. Just break off a chunk and enjoy it. Now these are my kind of people!

Breakfast

The Ruby Slipper: The morning before our swamp tour we enjoyed breakfast at the famous Ruby Slipper. The Ruby Slipper is a post-Katrina success story and an amazing place for a unique New Orleans breakfast. The eggs cochon is a Ruby Slipper specialty. They’ve taken apple-braised pork debris and piled that onto a buttermilk biscuit, then topped that with poached eggs and hollandaise sauce. Delicious and very filling. I highly recommend trying it if you have the chance. Another Ruby Slipper specialty is the BBQ shrimp and grits. Please note that ‘bbq’ in New Orleans does not mean smothered in BBQ sauce like it does in the Midwest. BBQ there, just means grilled. Pair either of these meals with a mimosa or bloody mary and you’ll turn non-morning people into morning people with just one bite.

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Eggs Cochon, The Ruby Slipper

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BBQ Shrimp & Grits, The Ruby Slipper

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The Ruby Slipper, New Orleans

Café Du Monde: Of course, no trip to New Orleans would be complete without a stop at Café Du Monde. Beignets and chicory coffee are a great way to start the morning. A few words of advice for visiting Café Du Monde: 1.) Don’t wear dark clothes, 2.) Bring cash and have it ready, 3.) Don’t wait for a table, if you see one open take it, even if it’s not been cleaned yet. They’ll clean it when they come to take your order, 4.) Have your order decided before your server arrives, 5.) Don’t inhale right when you’re taking a bite, that powdered sugar with get you!

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Beignets & Chicory Coffee, Cafe Du Monde

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Cafe Du Monde, New Orleans

Croissant d’Or Patisserie: If you’re looking for a lighter breakfast, this adorable French bakery is a must. Nothing like a meringue and vanilla latte to start your morning. If you prefer savory instead of sweet, they have plenty of options for you as well. Everything is made fresh daily.

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Vanilla Latte & Meringue, Croissant d’Or Patisserie

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Croissant d’Or Patisserie, New Orleans

Lunch
Muriel’s: If you’re in or around Jackson Square during lunch time, Muriel’s is an excellent place for some local fare. We started with some squash soup with crème fraiche, which was delightfully sweet. For our meals, we chose the blackened Mississippi catfish with buffalo sauce and the stuffed mirliton. Mirliton is a type of squash that is common in Louisiana and very popular around Thanksgiving. The mirliton was filled with Andouille stuffing and a creole shrimp resting in a roasted tomato sauce. The catfish was melt-in-your-mouth perfect, especially with the butter sauce. If you’re just looking to have a couple of drinks, Muriel’s has a beautiful balcony that overlooks Jackson Square.

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Stuffed Mirliton, Muriel’s

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Blackened Mississippi Catfish, Muriel’s

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Squash Soup with Creme Fraiche, Muriel’s

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Muriel’s, New Orleans

Acme Oyster House: Another New Orleans institution is the Acme Oyster house, which was established in 1910. We arrived for Sunday lunch around 11:30 and the restaurant was full and had about 20+ people standing in line outside. This for me, makes the anticipation of food so much greater. If there’s that many people waiting to get in, you know you’re in for a special treat. They did not disappoint. After slurping down a dozen raw oysters on the half shell, Reed and I devoured fried oyster and fried shrimp Po’Boys respectively. Amazing!

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Shrimp Po’Boy, Acme Oyster House

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Acme Oyster House, New Orleans

Supper
Antoine’s: The first meal we had in New Orleans was at the famous Antoine’s. This restaurant has been operated by the same family since 1840, and is the birthplace of Oysters Rockefeller. We enjoyed three different types of baked oyster on the half shell for our first course. We absolutely had to try the oysters Rockefeller which boasts the original Rockefeller sauce that was created in 1889. In addition, we also tried Huitres Thermidor which is an oyster baked on the half shell with bacon and tomato sauce and the Huitres Bienville, which is an oyster baked on the half shell with a white wine sauce, onions, pimento and fresh peppers. For my first time having fresh Gulf oysters, it was an amazing experience. For our entrées we both chose a filet of flakey, buttery gulf fish, one with lump crab meat sautéed in butter and the other topped with shrimp, mushrooms, oysters and cheese sauce.

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Stuffed Baked Oysters, Antoine’s

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Filet de Gulf Poisson Pontchartrain, Antoine’s

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Antoine’s, New Orleans

Arnaud’s: Arnaud’s has a very long and colorful history, which you can read about here. Arnaud’s has an amazing menu which allowed us to try a number of different local dishes. We started our meal out with Alligator sausage and turtle soup. The alligator sausage tastes a lot like most sausage, which means it was delicious. The turtle soup on the other hand, has a very distinct flavor. It’s a very hearty dish and was very enjoyable. For our main courses, we chose veal wohl and Fish Grenobloise. All of our food was absolutely amazing, since I forgot to take pictures of it. Believe me, even without seeing it, it was GOOD!

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Arnaud’s, New Orleans

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Paladar 511: It’s not your typical New Orleans restaurant. Paladar 511 does Italian food their way. The house made ravioli is my absolute favorite item on the menu. I love ravioli, I love mushrooms, the sauce is amazing! I really have no words for it. It’s that good. The wagyu hangar steak is a must. You really can’t beat wagyu beef. Their menu is always changing, but everything we ate there was incredible. It’s unique and very well executed. It’s no wonder it was named one of New Orleans Top 10 Restaurants for 2019!

 

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House Made Raviolo, Paladar 511

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Wagyu Steak, Paladar 511

Believe me when I say, all the food we ate in New Orleans was absolutely amazing! You can’t find food like this anywhere else. Make sure you visit hungry. Most of the places we ate at were on the expensive side, but there’s plenty of restaurants down there to fit any budget. Bon Appetite!

 

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